Be Holy

Posted: 5th June 2014 by Rob in Uncategorized

200604_120_art_RyleJ.C. Ryle on Holiness

 
“A life of daily self-consecration and daily communion with God should be aimed at by everyone who professes to be a believer…we should strive to attain the habit of going to the Lord Jesus Christ with everything we find a burden, whether great or small, and casting it upon Him.
The New Testament teaches us that we want something more than generalities about holy living, which often prick no conscience and give no offence. (“We want” as in we desire or better understood as “we are want of” is in something lacking)
True holiness does not consist merely of believing and feeling, but of doing and bearing, and a practical exhibition of active and passive grace.

“Our tongues, our tempers, our natural passions and inclinations – our conduct as parents and children, masters and servants, husbands and wives, rulers and subjects – our dress, our employment of time, our behavior in business, our demeanor in sickness and health, in riches and in poverty – (all, all of these matter).

Ryle was a 19th-century Anglican pastor. He was born in 1816. When he died in 1900, he was relatively unknown outside the Anglican Church in Britain. Ryle’s most popular works — Holiness, Five English Reformers, or Great Leaders of the Eighteenth Century. “A hundred years later,” wrote his biographer, “we can see that there were few more influential evangelicals in the Victorian era than Bishop Ryle.”2 Ryle was a contemporary of Charles H. Spurgeon, Dwight L. Moody, George Mueller, and Hudson Taylor. When Ryle was 15, Charles Darwin graduated from Cambridge. His was the age of Dickens, the American Civil War, and a British Empire on which the sun never set.

Holiness – Ryle pdf   – Click for PDF Book